Volunteer in Focus: Frank Carroll


Frank by Frank!

Frank by Frank!


Born and raised in Philadelphia, Frank Carroll lived there for 50 years on and off but first left in 1975 to attend NYU film school. He left NYU after a year because he became distracted by punk rock. He went back to Philly and played in bands, keyboards and base. He was also a stagehand at the University of Pennsylvania for a while. Also, through the 90’s he was also a graphic designer, and ran his own adult website. For personal reasons, he relocated to Provincetown in 2000 and helped to establish their first public access station, reconnecting with his visual media roots. They started off doing town meetings and other programs on the government side of PEG. It was fun. He felt that he was doing something that was really important. There were so many artists there, it was great to give them an outlet. He eventually got priced out of town and returned to Philly. He continued to maintain his website and did videography and graphic design for adult videos.


A relationship brought Frank to Portland. Within a year of moving to Portland, he came to PMC (then CTN) to volunteer in order to take classes. What caught his attention at first was watching Lighthouse Jubilees. He enjoyed them and thought they were sweet, “a pleasure to work with… and easy.” He first started off sitting at the front desk. Reception was a volunteer position at the time. That year he received CTN’s Volunteer of the Year award. He had many interesting conversations people who walked off Congress Street. After a few months, he started to work on Anne Haskell’s show, Haskell from the House. He found those shows very interesting and informative. He has mostly worked audio, which is what he did as a stagehand in Philly. He worked on most of the long-time shows, such as Derry Rundlett, Harold Pachios, Bob Baldacci and the Mayor’s shows. He remembesr having to turn down F. Lee Bailey’s mic because he started to snore while on the show. Things have come almost full circle now that he is working on Anne Haskell’s new show, Mainely Vets. As more big money comes into town, Frank feels that people become marginalized and “public access is a way to be heard.” Frank likes working here because it gives him a chance to be creative, he believes in the importance of free speech and it’s fun. “Mostly it’s fun,” he said. “If it weren’t fun, I wouldn’t do it.”